Los Angeles Dispute Resolution Attorney

If you’ve suffered any kind of injury and think you may wind up entangled in a lawsuit, you may start to imagine trial proceedings and all that goes with it. However, the majority of legal disputes find alternatives to litigation for several reasons. Primarily, litigation can be expensive and time-consuming. Legal professionals bill hourly rates, and scheduling court appearances and hearings can sometimes take months between new developments. Litigation is also typically stressful for all parties involved. The outcomes of litigation can sometimes surprise the parties of a lawsuit.

Most civil disputes aim for arbitration or mediation rather than litigation. While litigation can take months or years to finish and often entails astronomical legal fees for both sides of the table, alternative dispute resolution usually achieves a mutually agreeable solution more quickly and painlessly for all parties involved. The team at Mathew & George are experienced in dispute resolution tactics and can help you settle your lawsuit without costing a fortune.

At Mathew & George, our team of Los Angeles dispute resolution lawyers are dedicated to our client’s success, regardless of the case. We do not shy away from intense litigation, and we have a reputation for tenaciously pursuing justice on behalf of our clients. However, we also understand that some people simply want their cases handled quickly and fairly. We can help facilitate any kind of alternative dispute resolution for most cases. Reach out to our team and set up a consultation with one of our Los Angeles dispute resolution attorneys. We will review the details of your situation and let you know how we can help.

Alternative Dispute Resolution Options in Los Angeles

There are two types of alternative dispute resolution: mediation and arbitration. Both methods are geared toward preventing a case from going to trial and obtaining a quick and successful agreement between the parties. What is the major difference between these two forms of alternative dispute resolution? Arbitration is a legally binding process, whereas mediation is simply a means to facilitate negotiations between the parties.

Mediation has become a popular choice for many cases – especially those that are fairly straightforward. A neutral third-party, usually another attorney agreed upon by both the plaintiff’s and defendant’s counsels, acts as a mediator in settlement negotiations. Mediation allows the parties to have a more relaxed method of airing grievances and offering their interpretations of events. Having a neutral party assess the validity of the parties’ claims may also help them see things in a different light, often leading to agreeable outcomes for both parties.

Before starting mediation, the parties typically enter into a pre-mediation contract. These contracts stipulate that the mediation is non-binding and confidential and outline the length, content, and conduct of the mediation. Both parties will agree to negotiate in good faith until it is readily apparent that doing so is no longer possible or will not yield a mutually agreeable solution.

Our Los Angeles Dispute Resolution Lawyers Are Experienced Arbitrators

Arbitration works similarly to mediation in that a neutral third-party, or arbitrator in this case, helps facilitate negotiations. However, the arbitrator decides the outcome. In most cases, a panel of arbitrators conducts the proceedings, or each side will select an arbitrator and both will decide on a ruling. In a panel, the ruling is decided by popular vote.

While mediation tends to relieve tension for both sides of the table, arbitration often has the opposite effect and tends to take the form of a trial – only much faster. Arbitration is cheaper, faster, and more flexible than litigation. Arbitration also helps avoid hostility by providing intermediaries to encourage productive discussion. However, it is important to remember that if you decide to pursue arbitration, the final decision is hard to overturn. Trial verdicts can be appealed, but the arbitrator’s decision (except in limited circumstances) is final.

Additionally, the arbitrators themselves may prove to be worrisome. Arbitrators may not be entirely objective and could potentially lean toward either side due to personal feelings or interests. It is important to be confident in your decision to pursue arbitration; your options for recourse after an unfavorable ruling are limited.